New York Times (YouTube Channel), “Why It’s Hard to Keep the Pounds Off”

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The Video

New York Times joins two previous winners of the reality series The Biggest Loser in their struggle to keep the extraordinary weight loss they achieved on the show up. The story is not all positive with experts offering support in the form of scientific theories why it is especially difficult to keep the pounds off.

Language Focus and Level

This video provides an easy to understand voice-over with more challenging, interview-style dialogue making it good for classes in which levels may vary. The video could be used with strong intermediate and upper intermediate classes.

In talking about their experience since the show, the couple use the present perfect simple and continuous and you can find activities connected to this in the worksheet below.

Worksheet

thumb A worksheet with accompanying activities is available here: The Biggest Loser

Availability

Watch the video via YouTube.

Mark Albion (Free Range Studios), What Is “The Good Life” Parable

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The Video

New York Times bestselling author Mark Albion’s 3-minute animated movie “The Good Life” produced with Free Range Studios (The Story of Stuff; The Meatrix) and based on Mark’s new book, More Than Money.

A young man takes a break after finishing business school in a small fishing village. He proposes a business proposition to an old fisherman who enjoys the slow pace of life and on doing so learns an important life lesson himself.

Level and Language Focus

The narration of the video is fairly slow and the vocabulary is not too complicated therefore the video could be used in pre-intermediate and intermediate classes.

An obvious grammar point in this video is second conditional, which is used throughout. A discussion point to the video could be free time and work-life balance.

Worksheet
A worksheet can be found here:
The Good Life Parable (Right Click, Save As…)

Availability

Watch the video on YouTube.

New York Times, “Small Plates”

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The Clip

A group of kids are taken to an exclusive New York restaurant to sample a tasting menu of seven dishes. The clip is quite charming, inoffensive and works well as a gentle opening to a class.

Level and Language Focus

The children use many examples of verbs of the senses (“This tastes like soap…”) to discuss the dishes. This grammar is usually introduced at B2 level although it should not be difficult for lower levels.

Children’s voices are generally a little more difficult to understand however, in this video, the language is pretty simple so you could show this video at Intermediate or Upper Intermediate.

Worksheet
A worksheet can be found here:
Small Plates Worksheet (Right Click, Save Target As…)
A follow-up game based on the grammar of verbs of the senses is here:
Verbs of Senses Game (Right Click, Save Target As…)

Availability

You can view the video on YouTube and New York Times.